Posts Tagged ‘adventure program’

The Top 5 Job Opportunities for a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Fort Lewis College in Adventure Education

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

 

Frequently we are asked by parents of prospective students “what can you do with an Adventure Education degree?” Here is a list of the top 5 job opportunities for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Adventure Education:

  1. School-based outdoor education and adventure education programs These are typically programs in independent schools. This past year one of our AE students did an internship at Timberline Academy in Durango, and then was immediately hired as a teacher at that school. Other examples of schools that hire staff to run their outdoor programs include Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Sandia Prep and Albuquerque Academy in Albuquerque, NM, Chapman School in California, a large number of prep schools in New England (i.e. Proctor Academy, Holderness School, White Mountain School, etc), Wasatch Academy in Utah currently has one of our AE majors interning there in their Outdoor Program.
  2. College recreation programs Last spring we posted a job for an Outdoor Recreation Director at Harvard University which required a B.A. in Adventure Education. Last year one of our AE graduates interned at a 2 year college in Coeur de Alene, Idaho. Another of our AE graduates did an internship with the University of Las Vegas-Nevada.
  3. Adventure Therapy or Wilderness Therapy programs such as Open Sky Wilderness based in Durango, CO. Last year our AE 450 class “Organization and Administration of Adventure Education” did an extensive accreditation review project with Open Sky. Other therapeutic programs are in almost every state.
  4. Environmental Education programs such as Keystone Environmental Center. Many states have an outdoor/environmental education center that school districts send all their 6th graders to for a week. These programs hire staff. Another of our AE graduates did an internship with Southwest Conservation Corps.
  5. Other Independent programs such as Boojum Institute in California (works with school, community and corporate groups), ropes course programs and of course seasonal work in programs such as Outward Bound and NOLS. Our Adventure Education program sent another of our AE graduates to intern with an environmental canopy tours program in North Carolina.

As you can see from the list above, there are MANY job opportunities for employment with a degree in Adventure Education. The Bureau of Labor statistics also predicts that from 2010-2024 jobs in this category are expected to grow faster than average.

Telemark Skiing AE 141-Backcountry Skiing in the San Juan Mountains around Fort Lewis College

Monday, November 26th, 2012

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enyAXEJfDAU[/youtube]

This course, offered by the Adventure Education B.A. degree program at Fort Lewis College in Durango CO, is an introduction to telemark and backcountry skiing for the adventure educator.  It includes turning, body position, selection, use and maintenance of equipment, safety procedures, group management, and winter alpine Leave No Trace practices.  This course is restricted to Adventure Education majors and minors. 

 

Prerequisites: Adventure Education major. Students who anticipate declaring an Adventure Education minor should speak with the instructor about waiver of prerequisites.  Additional course fee: $150, paid when you registered (which covers gear maintenance and replacement, ski passes, and transportation).

Course AE 101-“Foundations of Adventure Education” Introduces the Meaning of Outdoor Education

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

The primary purpose of this course, is for you to explore the match between you and adventure education. You will have opportunities to determine how you wish to be involved in the profession of using outdoor education, by discovering professional career paths—those that generally require a college degree—in schools, outdoor and environmental education programs, therapeutic adventure programs, and more.

 

An ADVENTURE EDUCATION “expedition”:

Think of Foundations of Adventure Education as your 15-week adventure expedition. Adventures involve risk, expanding one’s comfort zone, and embracing the unknown. Successful expedition teams work together to accomplish common goals, with everyone giving 110%. Here in this course, the risks usually won’t be physical ones, but you may encounter potential academic risks. Just like in the wilderness, these risks are best managed when everyone is prepared and committed to learning, which promotes a community of trust and mutual support. Although broad topic areas and much of the reading material that takes us toward our goals is determined, you will be involved in some of the decisions along the path.

If this sounds like a course you would like to take as part of your degree path for Adventure Education, learn more at:  Fort Lewis College/Adventure Ed  or see what our current students, alumni and faculty are talking about in the world of Adventure Education on our Facebook Group page http://www.fortlewis.edu/adventureed/Home.aspx

AE321-Lead Rock Climbing Prepares Adventure Education Majors at Fort Lewis College

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012

AE 321 is an advanced climbing skills course focusing on traditional lead climbing, including selection and placement of protection, route finding, lead climbing and belaying techniques, multiple pitch climbing, advanced anchor building, rescue systems, and climbing instructional strategies.

 

Like other AE outdoor skills courses this course is not an activity course, per se, but a professional skills course for preparing adventure educators in the field of outdoor education to work effectively in institutional settings. 

 For those without leading experience, your climbing knowledge and skills will grow dramatically. For those with leading experience, this course will introduce you to the institutional context, expand your repertoire of lead climbing skills, and begin to prepare you to work directly with the kinds of clients/students you may encounter in an adventure education program which uses lead climbing to accomplish educational goals. If you’re interested in working as a professional climbing guide or for an organization like Outward Bound or NOLS with a well-managed climbing or mountaineering program, then I suggest you eventually look into seeking certification through the American Mountain Guides Association (AMGA).  This course provides a strong foundation for moving in that direction, particularly if you’ve had limited exposure to lead climbing in institutional settings. 

 What this course is not:

  • If you have limited traditional lead climbing experience, this class will not turn you into a masterful lead climber – there’s simply not enough time for this. However, it will serve as a “spring-board” for further education and development. 
  • The focus in this course is not on making you a stronger climber, but a smarter climber. You can get strong on your own time. 

 

PREREQUISITES:

Official:

  • AE 101 (Foundations of AE) & AE 121 (Top Rope Rock Climbing).
  • At least one year of personal top-rope climbing experience. 
  • AE major or minor.

 

Unofficial:

  • Proficiency in all AE 121 skills, including:
    • Being able to set up and manage a top rope rock climb using a “top” or “sling-shot” belay system.
    • All knots and basic rope work taught in AE 121.
  • You are active and healthy enough to be able to follow 5.8 and carry a 50 lb. pack uphill for 30 minutes. 

5 Great things about Adventure Education at Fort Lewis College

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Some highlights of the Adventure Education program for your consideration! Listed below are some of the reasons our students choose our outdoor education program:

Don’t block the view!

  1. A 15-credit immersion semester where you take only Adventure Education courses, spending 4 to 10 days at a time backpacking and canoeing in the mountains and deserts of the Four Corners region. Courses include Wilderness Expedition (AE 201), Adventure Leadership (AE 210), Teaching Methods for Adventure Educators (AE 220), Wilderness First Responder (230), Challenge Course Fundamentals (AE 251).
  2. Experiential and project-based instruction where you learn by doing, as well as by reading and writing about what you’re doing. You produce projects and programs for real client groups, attend and present workshops at professional conferences, and have opportunities to do actual teaching.
  3. Accrue at least 60 days of leadership and instruction experience, beyond class time, typically through summer jobs you must plan for with camps and outdoor programs. This is a required prerequisite for the internship for AE majors.
  4. A three-course research requirement for AE majors, where you learn statistics, research methodology, and create and present an original piece of research to the campus community. Research skills make you more employable with programs that analyze data to describe their results.
  5. An internship with an adventure-based program lasting 7 to 15 weeks. The internship for AE majors is often a stepping stone to your first job as an adventure educator.
These are the things that make a Bachelor of Arts degree from Fort Lewis College in Adventure Education a valuable investment for life!

Conference brings adventure education professionals to Fort Lewis College campus

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

Lee Frazer, assistant professor in FLC's Adventure Education major, instructs students.

Lee Frazer, assistant professor in FLC’s Adventure Education major, instructs students.

There’s no better setting for outdoor education enthusiasts to gather than on a campus surrounded by inspiring mountain vistas.

That’s what the members of the Association for Experiential Education will get when the 2012 Rocky Mountain Region AEE conference convenes on the Fort Lewis College campus Friday, March 23, through Sunday, March 25. The AEE’s Rocky Mountain Region includes Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, and Sonora and Sinaloa, Mexico.

And for students in the Fort Lewis College Adventure Education program, it’s an opportunity to meet and work with professionals and practitioners in the field, as well as other students, professors, and educators.

“This is a a chance for students to get immersed in the professional scene of adventure education, because there will be people here from all over the region,” says Adventure Education Director and Professor Bob Stremba. “And it’s also a chance for adventure education students to present a workshop in front those people. They’ll get great experience and feedback.”

In the Fort Lewis College Adventure Education program, students learn how to lead, teach, and facilitate in a variety of settings that use outdoor and adventure environments, focusing on human-powered outdoor pursuits, including backpacking, ropes-challenge courses, rock climbing, mountaineering, and river running.

Thanks to FLC’s location between the southern Rocky Mountains and the desert Southwest, the program’s students are in the field about 40 percent of the time, some even spending seven-week blocks that include 21 days in the mountains, rivers and canyons of Colorado and Utah, learning about wilderness expedition planning, adventure leadership, and methods of teaching adventure education.

The AEE conference will feature speakers, student research presentations and poster sessions, and the announcing of annual awards for Experiential Leader, Organizational Member, and Rising Star of the Year awards. There will also be dozens of workshops, including telemark ski instructing, swiftwater rescue, and adaptive winter sports guiding.

Adventure Education at Fort Lewis College shares video of Immersion Semester trip

Monday, February 27th, 2012

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxgRampAc8o[/youtube]

One of the great things about the B.A. degree in Adventure Education from Fort Lewis College is the Immersion Semester-where you take only Adventure Education courses, spending 4-10 days at a time backpacking and canoeing in the mountains and deserts of the Four Corners region.  This video was shot by one of our students on the 10-day course which went to Utah.

This Immersion Semester gives you 15 credits towards your degree and also includes a Wilderness First Responder class where you will receive your certification, and an option of taking either a “special topics” course (Fall 2012 will be a canyoneering course) or a Challenge Course Programming class.  What a great way to get your B.A. in Adventure Education-experiential learning in what we consider an unparallelled location that offers a variety of experiences, all close by!

Dream Town=Durango AND an Adventure Education degree program too? SWEET!

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

 

 

Read below exactly what makes Fort Lewis College’s location unparalleled for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Adventure Education! 

By most ski town standards, Durango, Colorado, doesn’t hold up to the dramatic proximity of, say, an Aspen or Telluride, where slopes stare you in the face just leaving the grocery store. But what makes this southwestern town (pop.16,000) so dreamy is what it’s not. There’s no gondola you can catch just outside a sushi joint, but look north, where the 14,000-foot peaks of the San Juan Mountains form a serrated horizon, where acres upon acres of lift, snowcat, backcounty and heli-accessed skiing provide nearly year-round opportunities. No, Durango is not technically a ski town (unless of course you count city-run Chapman Hill, the in-town double rope tow slope where kids learn to ski under the lights). Rather a mountain-biking, kayaking, rock climbing, fly-fishing, hiking town with nearby access to some of the best skiing in the U.S.”

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION is just one of the best reasons to come here:
Our location in the Four Corner’s is UNPARALLELED! We think we have the best learning laboratory in the country. In fact, we’re one of the few places in the country where you could snow ski, mountain bike, kayak, and hike a slot canyon – all in the same day. This region is also diverse, culturally, which we believe is a plus too.

However, the more important reason is this:
– ACADEMIC RIGOR
We are one of the few undergraduate programs in the country to require our majors to do a senior research project. This makes our graduates very competitive which graduate schools and employers love. In addition, we require our graduates to complete an internship. Finally, we offer an Immersion Semester, where students take nothing else but Adventure Education courses for a unique experience.  Together, we believe these experiences will set you apart from similar degree programs.
Read more about the latest accolade for Durango here – http://www.skinet.com/skiing/photo-gallery/dream-town-durango

5 great things about the Adventure Education Bachelor of Arts degree program from Fort Lewis College

Friday, January 20th, 2012
Some highlights of the Adventure Education program for your consideration!  Listed below are some of the reasons our students choose our outdoor education program:
  1.   
  •  A 15-credit immersion semester where you take only Adventure Education courses, spending 4 to 10 days at a time backpacking and canoeing in the mountains and deserts of the Four Corners region. Courses include Wilderness Expedition (AE 201), Adventure Leadership (AE 210), Teaching Methods for Adventure Educators (AE 220), Wilderness First Responder (230), Challenge Course Fundamentals (AE 251).
  •   Experiential and project-based instruction where you learn by doing, as well as by reading and writing about what you’re doing. You produce projects and programs for real client groups, attend and present workshops at professional conferences, and have opportunities to do actual teaching.
  •   Accrue at least 60 days of leadership and instruction experience, beyond class time, typically through summer jobs you must plan for with camps and outdoor programs. This is a required prerequisite for the internship for AE majors.
  •   A three-course research requirement for AE majors, where you learn statistics, research methodology, and create and present an original piece of research to the campus community. Research skills make you more employable with programs that analyze data to describe their results.
  •   An internship with an adventure-based program lasting 7 to 15 weeks. The internship for AE majors is often a stepping stone to your first job as an adventure educator.
These are the things that make a Bachelor of Arts degree from Fort Lewis College in Adventure Education a valuable investment for life! 

5 Great Job Opportunities for Adventure Education Majors from Fort Lewis College

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Frequently we are asked by parents of prospective students “what can you do with an Adventure Education degree?” Here is a list of the top 5 job opportunities for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Adventure Education:

  1. School-based outdoor education and adventure education programs These are typically programs in independent schools. This past year one of our AE students did an internship at Timberline Academy in Durango, and then was immediately hired as a teacher at that school. Other examples of schools that hire staff to run their outdoor programs include Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Sandia Prep and Albuquerque Academy in Albuquerque, NM, Chapman School in California, a large number of prep schools in New England (i.e. Proctor Academy, Holderness School, White Mountain School, etc), Wasatch Academy in Utah currently has one of our AE majors interning there in their Outdoor Program.
  2. College recreation programs Last spring we posted a job for an Outdoor Recreation Director at Harvard University which required a B.A. in Adventure Education. Last year one of our AE graduates interned at a 2 year college in Coeur de Alene, Idaho. Another of our AE graduates did an internship with the University of Las Vegas-Nevada.
  3. Adventure Therapy or Wilderness Therapy programs such as Open Sky Wilderness based in Durango, CO. Last year our AE 450 class “Organization and Administration of Adventure Education” did an extensive accreditation review project with Open Sky. Other therapeutic programs are in almost every state.
  4. Environmental Education programs such as Keystone Environmental Center. Many states have an outdoor/environmental education center that school districts send all their 6th graders to for a week. These programs hire staff. Another of our AE graduates did an internship with Southwest Conservation Corps.
  5. Other Independent programs such as Boojum Institute in California (works with school, community and corporate groups), ropes course programs and of course seasonal work in programs such as Outward Bound and NOLS. Our Adventure Education program sent another of our AE graduates to intern with an environmental canopy tours program in North Carolina.

As you can see from the list above, there are MANY job opportunities for employment with a degree in Adventure Education. The Bureau of Labor statistics also predicts that from 2010-2024 jobs in this category are expected to grow faster than average.