Posts Tagged ‘Outward Bound’

5 Great Job Opportunities for Adventure Education Majors from Fort Lewis College

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Frequently we are asked by parents of prospective students “what can you do with an Adventure Education degree?” Here is a list of the top 5 job opportunities for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Adventure Education:

  1. School-based outdoor education and adventure education programs These are typically programs in independent schools. This past year one of our AE students did an internship at Timberline Academy in Durango, and then was immediately hired as a teacher at that school. Other examples of schools that hire staff to run their outdoor programs include Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Sandia Prep and Albuquerque Academy in Albuquerque, NM, Chapman School in California, a large number of prep schools in New England (i.e. Proctor Academy, Holderness School, White Mountain School, etc), Wasatch Academy in Utah currently has one of our AE majors interning there in their Outdoor Program.
  2. College recreation programs Last spring we posted a job for an Outdoor Recreation Director at Harvard University which required a B.A. in Adventure Education. Last year one of our AE graduates interned at a 2 year college in Coeur de Alene, Idaho. Another of our AE graduates did an internship with the University of Las Vegas-Nevada.
  3. Adventure Therapy or Wilderness Therapy programs such as Open Sky Wilderness based in Durango, CO. Last year our AE 450 class “Organization and Administration of Adventure Education” did an extensive accreditation review project with Open Sky. Other therapeutic programs are in almost every state.
  4. Environmental Education programs such as Keystone Environmental Center. Many states have an outdoor/environmental education center that school districts send all their 6th graders to for a week. These programs hire staff. Another of our AE graduates did an internship with Southwest Conservation Corps.
  5. Other Independent programs such as Boojum Institute in California (works with school, community and corporate groups), ropes course programs and of course seasonal work in programs such as Outward Bound and NOLS. Our Adventure Education program sent another of our AE graduates to intern with an environmental canopy tours program in North Carolina.

As you can see from the list above, there are MANY job opportunities for employment with a degree in Adventure Education. The Bureau of Labor statistics also predicts that from 2010-2024 jobs in this category are expected to grow faster than average.

Adventure Education major highlights for your consideration

Sunday, July 24th, 2011

The Adventure Education curriculum will challenge you, and is intended for the student who is academically motivated, enjoys reading and writing along with spending lots of time outdoors, and has professional interests in helping others learn and grow through outdoor pursuits. The expectations are high, but the rewards can be transformative.

Our four full-time staff and several additional part-time faculty are readily available to students, often involving you as a colleague in professional projects and conference presentations, and they walk their talk, with years of experience as practitioners and teachers of adventure education. We are eager to help you succeed here at Fort Lewis College, and progress toward a rewarding career in field-based leadership and instruction, and administrative positions with adventure education, outdoor education, therapeutic adventure, and environmental programs.

If you are interested in embracing both the challenges and rewards of the Adventure Education program, we are eager to see you as one of our students starting this fall. If you have any questions, please browse our website   http://www.fortlewis.edu/adventureed/ or give the Adventure Education Program Director, Dr. Bob Stremba, a call at (970)247-6295.

Adventure Education, Outward Bound and Fort Lewis College Professor Lee Frazer

Friday, April 15th, 2011

Our Assistant Professor, Lee Frazer, has accepted an invitation to speak at the Outward Bound (OB) National Trainers Training, a gathering of staff trainers from throughout the OB system.  He was the only professional invited to speak who is not a full-time Outward Bound employee.  His talk is entitled “Neuroscience and Adult Learning Theory: Implications for Innovative Training and Development.”  Since this an inside event and only for people associated with Outward Bound, I don’t have a link for you, but you can check out the Outward Bound website at www.outwardbound.org

Processing and facilitation in Adventure Education

Thursday, November 11th, 2010

Here’s a quick update from the front lines on this Veterans Day.

I’m taking an awesome class this semester called AE 350 – Adventure Processing and Facilitation.  In a nutshell, we are learning  about theories and methods of effective facilitation of adventure activities, as well as creative and meaningful ways to debrief the experiences.  This has been my favorite class in the AE program thus far (not counting the expedition portions of the AE block semester, of course).  It is fun, challenging, practical, and thought provoking.  It is the synthesis of many of the theories and concepts we have been learning since AE 101.  And as Professor Bob Stremba is fond of saying, it is “The WHY behind the What.” 

Our current class projects involves co-leading an initiative with another classmate and debriefing it at the end.  My partner, Veronica, and I are developing a prop and activity called The Pipeline which involves a group rolling a marble from point A to point B using sections of PVC pipe.  I spent this morning cutting and sanding various diameters and lengths of pipe and we will glue fittings and paint them shortly.  The point of the activity is to assist groups with communication and teamwork.  I am excited to try it out when we present next Wednesday.

Okay, I’ve got to run to Home Depot for a few supplies.  Until next time…

Thank a vet.  Freedom isn’t free.

– Dave Lynch

5 Top Jobs for Adventure Education Majors

Friday, October 15th, 2010

Frequently we are asked by parents of prospective students “what can you do with an Adventure Education degree?”  Here is a list of the top 5 job opportunities for a B.A. in Adventure Education:

  1. School-based outdoor education and adventure education programs  These are typically programs in independent schools.  This past year one of our AE students did an internship at Timberline Academy in Durango, and then was immediately hired as a teacher at that school.  Other examples of schools that hire staff to run their outdoor programs include Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Sandia Prep and Albuquerque Academy in Albuquerque, NM, Chapman School in California, a large number of prep schools in New England (i.e. Proctor Academy, Holderness School, White Mountain School, etc), Wasatch Academy in Utah currently has one of our AE majors interning there in their Outdoor Program.
  2. College recreation programs  Last spring we posted a job for an Outdoor Recreation Director at Harvard University which required a B.A. in Adventure Education.  Last year one of our AE graduates  interned at a 2 year college in Coeur de Alene, Idaho.  Another of our AE graduates did an internship with the University of Las Vegas-Nevada.
  3. Adventure Therapy or Wilderness Therapy programs  such as Open Sky Wilderness based in Durango, CO.  Last year our AE 450 class “Organization and Administration of Adventure Education” did an extensive accreditation review project with Open Sky.  Other therapeutic programs are in almost every state.
  4. Environmental Education programs  such as Keystone Environmental Center.  Many states have an outdoor/environmental education center that school districts send all their 6th graders to for a week.  These programs hire staff.  Another of our AE graduates did an internship with Southwest Conservation Corps.
  5. Other Independent programs such as Boojum Institute in California (works with school, community and corporate groups), ropes course programs and of course seasonal work in programs such as Outward Bound and NOLS.  Our Adventure Education program sent another of our AE graduates to intern with an environmental canopy tours program in North Carolina.

As you can see from the list above, there are MANY job opportunities for employment with a degree in Adventure Education.  The Bureau of Labor statistics also predicts that from 2010-2024 jobs in this category are expected to grow faster than average.

Adventure Education Top Rope Rock Climb Class

Thursday, September 23rd, 2010

These are just a few of some outstanding photos taken by AE Major Dylan Weldin in instuctor Ball’s rock climbing class this semester.  These guys are doing their learning “on the rocks”….Class goes out to various local locations to practice rappels, belays, and all the necessary risk management issues that come with this type activity.  On an experiential level, they are learning valuable lessons in critical thinking, team building and leadership skills.  These are skills that can be applied to any career path a student may choose.  Most of our AE majors are interested in doing therapy work with at-risk populations, children and young adults. 

As an example to our students, Program Director Dr. Bob Stremba used skills similar to what the Top Rope Rock Climbing class were learning.   Over the summer of 2010 Bob instructed an Outward Bound course in the Colorado Rockies for teens who have lost a family member through death. “On ‘Heroic Journey’ I was impressed how these kids embraced the challenges of backpacking, rock climbing, and a high ropes course.” They dedicated their climb of a 13,000 peak to the one they lost, then built a rock cairn with each of their names on it. The combination of inspiring wilderness, with a supportive group of others who have been through the same circumstances was a wonderful example of how adventure education, in this case through Outward Bound, has such a strong effect.”

WHY ADVENTURE EDUCATION ROCKS AT FORT LEWIS COLLEGE!!  This  is just one way in which our students can utilize their degree in Adventure Education.  If the word “Education” inspires you at least as much as the word “Adventure”, then this may just be the program for you!