Posts Tagged ‘wilderness therapy’

The Top 5 Job Opportunities for a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Fort Lewis College in Adventure Education

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

 

Frequently we are asked by parents of prospective students “what can you do with an Adventure Education degree?” Here is a list of the top 5 job opportunities for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Adventure Education:

  1. School-based outdoor education and adventure education programs These are typically programs in independent schools. This past year one of our AE students did an internship at Timberline Academy in Durango, and then was immediately hired as a teacher at that school. Other examples of schools that hire staff to run their outdoor programs include Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Sandia Prep and Albuquerque Academy in Albuquerque, NM, Chapman School in California, a large number of prep schools in New England (i.e. Proctor Academy, Holderness School, White Mountain School, etc), Wasatch Academy in Utah currently has one of our AE majors interning there in their Outdoor Program.
  2. College recreation programs Last spring we posted a job for an Outdoor Recreation Director at Harvard University which required a B.A. in Adventure Education. Last year one of our AE graduates interned at a 2 year college in Coeur de Alene, Idaho. Another of our AE graduates did an internship with the University of Las Vegas-Nevada.
  3. Adventure Therapy or Wilderness Therapy programs such as Open Sky Wilderness based in Durango, CO. Last year our AE 450 class “Organization and Administration of Adventure Education” did an extensive accreditation review project with Open Sky. Other therapeutic programs are in almost every state.
  4. Environmental Education programs such as Keystone Environmental Center. Many states have an outdoor/environmental education center that school districts send all their 6th graders to for a week. These programs hire staff. Another of our AE graduates did an internship with Southwest Conservation Corps.
  5. Other Independent programs such as Boojum Institute in California (works with school, community and corporate groups), ropes course programs and of course seasonal work in programs such as Outward Bound and NOLS. Our Adventure Education program sent another of our AE graduates to intern with an environmental canopy tours program in North Carolina.

As you can see from the list above, there are MANY job opportunities for employment with a degree in Adventure Education. The Bureau of Labor statistics also predicts that from 2010-2024 jobs in this category are expected to grow faster than average.

Adventure Education in one of America’s Best River Towns

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

 

 Having your college located in a town like Durango that has 4 rivers flowing in a 20 mile radius is awesome.  Having  a college located in Durango that offers a degree in Adventure Education and uses those rivers to teach is priceless!

Read the article here Durango Is Best.

Fort Lewis College is doing just that-offering up an outdoor education degree program in Adventure Education.  For more information about Fort Lewis College in Durango Colorado click here  http://www.fortlewis.edu/  and for more information about the Bachelor of Arts degree in Adventure Education click here http://www.fortlewis.edu/adventureed/Home.aspx

5 Great Job Opportunities for Adventure Education Majors from Fort Lewis College

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Frequently we are asked by parents of prospective students “what can you do with an Adventure Education degree?” Here is a list of the top 5 job opportunities for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Adventure Education:

  1. School-based outdoor education and adventure education programs These are typically programs in independent schools. This past year one of our AE students did an internship at Timberline Academy in Durango, and then was immediately hired as a teacher at that school. Other examples of schools that hire staff to run their outdoor programs include Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Sandia Prep and Albuquerque Academy in Albuquerque, NM, Chapman School in California, a large number of prep schools in New England (i.e. Proctor Academy, Holderness School, White Mountain School, etc), Wasatch Academy in Utah currently has one of our AE majors interning there in their Outdoor Program.
  2. College recreation programs Last spring we posted a job for an Outdoor Recreation Director at Harvard University which required a B.A. in Adventure Education. Last year one of our AE graduates interned at a 2 year college in Coeur de Alene, Idaho. Another of our AE graduates did an internship with the University of Las Vegas-Nevada.
  3. Adventure Therapy or Wilderness Therapy programs such as Open Sky Wilderness based in Durango, CO. Last year our AE 450 class “Organization and Administration of Adventure Education” did an extensive accreditation review project with Open Sky. Other therapeutic programs are in almost every state.
  4. Environmental Education programs such as Keystone Environmental Center. Many states have an outdoor/environmental education center that school districts send all their 6th graders to for a week. These programs hire staff. Another of our AE graduates did an internship with Southwest Conservation Corps.
  5. Other Independent programs such as Boojum Institute in California (works with school, community and corporate groups), ropes course programs and of course seasonal work in programs such as Outward Bound and NOLS. Our Adventure Education program sent another of our AE graduates to intern with an environmental canopy tours program in North Carolina.

As you can see from the list above, there are MANY job opportunities for employment with a degree in Adventure Education. The Bureau of Labor statistics also predicts that from 2010-2024 jobs in this category are expected to grow faster than average.

Adventure Education Immersion Semester Highlights

Tuesday, December 6th, 2011

One of the unique program offerings that the Bachelor of Arts degree has is the “Immersion” semester.  

This is a  15-credit immersion semester where you take only Adventure Education courses, spending 4 to 10 days at a time backpacking and canoeing in the mountains and deserts of the Four Corners region. Courses include Wilderness Expedition (AE 201), Adventure Leadership (AE 210), Teaching Methods for Adventure Educators (AE 220), Wilderness First Responder (230), Challenge Course Fundamentals (AE 251).  Students participate in outdoor education, learning by doing what they will be teaching others.

Check out our Facebook Group page “Adventure Education at Fort Lewis College” for more photos of these expeditions, as well as other AE courses.

Why Adventure Education is so suited to Durango, CO-even Outside Magazine says so…

Monday, September 19th, 2011

Animas River Valley

Animas River Valley near Durango    Photographer: Greentheory

Durango, Colorado

Next Big Thing  By:

Think of it as a border town. It has Southwest underpinnings—Mesa Verde National Park is only 47 miles to the west—but because it sits in the lush Animas River Valley, it serves as the geographic and cultural link between high desert and high country. A thousand miles of mountain-biking trails surround the city (pop. 16,900), the largest wilderness area in Colorado is just to the north (500,000-acre Weminuche Wilderness), two ski resorts are an easy drive away, and the paddle-friendly Animas flows almost down Main Street. At night, four local craft breweries appease the nearly 4,000 students at Fort Lewis College.

Outside Magazine, October 2011

Adventure Education’s Popular Immersion Semester Underway at Fort Lewis College

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

So what exactly IS the Immersion Semester, you ask?  How about:  A 15-credit immersion semester where you take only Adventure Education courses, spending 4 to 10 days at a time backpacking and canoeing in the mountains and deserts of the Four Corners region. Courses include Wilderness Expedition (AE 201), Adventure Leadership (AE 210), Teaching Methods for Adventure (AE220).  The immersion semester is designed to be a four-month experience where your academic focus is only Adventure Education.   The entire semester-in the classroom, in the field, and study and preparation time in-between-is like an expedition, where you are part of a small learning community having shared goals. 

 This year’s groups went for their first expedition of 4 days into the Wilderness around Engineer Peak.  Here is just a few of the vistas that they passed through during class:

Gearing up for the Adventure Education Program at Fort Lewis College Fall 2011

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

The B.A. Adventure Education Program here in Durango CO is getting ready to welcome the largest group of students yet to be enrolled at Fort Lewis College since the program’s inception in 2007!     We are psyched for another great year of students who want to use the outdoors as a career in Adventure Education that will keep them in the great outdoors and provide a service to others as well. 

When you major in Adventure Ed, we provide all group gear—tarps and tents, cooking equipment, food, first aid kits, a satellite phone, maps, GPS devices, etc. You need to provide your own personal gear such as backpack, sleeping bag and pad, hiking boots, clothing, etc  Please find listed below some good resources for you to find your own personal gear:

Resources for Discount Outdoor Equipment

•     Sierra Trading Postwww.Sierratradingpost.com

Discounts of 35-70% on name brand outdoor gear, including backpacks, sleeping bags, climbing gear, and clothing.

•     Campmorwww.campmor.com

A discount outdoor equipment retailer for name brands.

•     REI Outletwww.rei.com/outlet  

•     Local seasonal sales: Gardenswarz fair ground sales, ski swaps, etc.

If you have more questions or need more information, please don’t hesitate to contact the program director, Dr. Bob Stremba at stremba_b@fortlewis.edu

Here’s to the best academic year yet!

Adventure Education major highlights for your consideration

Sunday, July 24th, 2011

The Adventure Education curriculum will challenge you, and is intended for the student who is academically motivated, enjoys reading and writing along with spending lots of time outdoors, and has professional interests in helping others learn and grow through outdoor pursuits. The expectations are high, but the rewards can be transformative.

Our four full-time staff and several additional part-time faculty are readily available to students, often involving you as a colleague in professional projects and conference presentations, and they walk their talk, with years of experience as practitioners and teachers of adventure education. We are eager to help you succeed here at Fort Lewis College, and progress toward a rewarding career in field-based leadership and instruction, and administrative positions with adventure education, outdoor education, therapeutic adventure, and environmental programs.

If you are interested in embracing both the challenges and rewards of the Adventure Education program, we are eager to see you as one of our students starting this fall. If you have any questions, please browse our website   http://www.fortlewis.edu/adventureed/ or give the Adventure Education Program Director, Dr. Bob Stremba, a call at (970)247-6295.

AE 450 students headed to Utah

Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011

The students of AE 450 – Organization and Administration of Adventure Education – are headed to Utah this week. Our first stop will be in Mt. Pleasant, Utah where we will consult with Wasatch Academy as they begin the process of seeking accreditation with the Association for Experiential Education. After a whirlwind tour of the academy, we will then drive to Utah Valley University for the Rocky Mountain Regional Conference of the Association for Experiential Education. Students will present on various topics such as wilderness art therapy, grief therapy, and a challenge of Kolb’s experiential learning cycle. We’re looking forward to it!

Processing and facilitation in Adventure Education

Thursday, November 11th, 2010

Here’s a quick update from the front lines on this Veterans Day.

I’m taking an awesome class this semester called AE 350 – Adventure Processing and Facilitation.  In a nutshell, we are learning  about theories and methods of effective facilitation of adventure activities, as well as creative and meaningful ways to debrief the experiences.  This has been my favorite class in the AE program thus far (not counting the expedition portions of the AE block semester, of course).  It is fun, challenging, practical, and thought provoking.  It is the synthesis of many of the theories and concepts we have been learning since AE 101.  And as Professor Bob Stremba is fond of saying, it is “The WHY behind the What.” 

Our current class projects involves co-leading an initiative with another classmate and debriefing it at the end.  My partner, Veronica, and I are developing a prop and activity called The Pipeline which involves a group rolling a marble from point A to point B using sections of PVC pipe.  I spent this morning cutting and sanding various diameters and lengths of pipe and we will glue fittings and paint them shortly.  The point of the activity is to assist groups with communication and teamwork.  I am excited to try it out when we present next Wednesday.

Okay, I’ve got to run to Home Depot for a few supplies.  Until next time…

Thank a vet.  Freedom isn’t free.

– Dave Lynch