“Quick! Bears! Do Something!”

By Zack Bauer, Local Food Security

It all started with a frantic email. “Someone do something! Bear’s are stalking the campus apartments!” In the wake of fear and paranoia, Rachel Landis and I knew what we had to do. We had to harvest all the apples. You may be asking, “How is collecting some fruit going to solve anything in that situation, except for maybe providing a sweet autumn snack?” The answer…be the bear before the bear can be the bear. Meaning, harvest all the apples near the campus apartments (Mears and Centennial) so that the bears don’t come back looking for more apples. This may seem selfish, taking all the apples for our own human selves and not saving any for our hungry furry neighbors. In reality we are actually saving these bears’ lives. By taking away these bears’ food supply in areas that have heavy human traffic, we are keeping these bears away from close human interactions. This keeps humans safe. It also keeps bears safe because a bear thats too comfortable with humans may become a target for euthanasia from the Colorado Department of Wildlife.

When I mentioned being the bear before the bear can be the bear, I wasn’t kidding. We, being the Local Food Security Initiative at the Environmental Center, take fruit gleaning very seriously. We try to collect the apples as quickly as possible, which includes acting like a bear. This includes climbing into the apple tree, shaking it to produce a hail storm of ripe fruit, collecting the crisp goodies, and leaving.

Our apple dream didn’t end with collecting apples. Being the EC, a non-for-profit who’s ambitions are high and dreams are grand, we needed money. Every year, at the annual Apple Days Festival in early October, the EC teams up with Cream Bean Berry to produce and sell delicious apple pie ice cream and vegan cinnamon apple ice cream as a fundraiser. The Apple Days Festival sadly was canceled this year, for no good reason, other than the fact that there were no apples in Durango (except for next to the Fort Lewis College apartments woot woot!). Even though the festival didn’t happen, the EC still wanted to sell fabulous apple ice cream made in conjunction with the finest artesian ice cream maker, Cream Bean Berry. But where to sell the ice cream?

After lots of brainstorming, including strongly considering selling the ice cream by peddling our EC bike late at night downtown while wearing an apple costume, we decided to sell the ice cream at the FLC Theatre production of “Urinetown”. Being an environmental play, this was the perfect place to have an EC fundraiser. People could eat ice cream and then watch the beautiful collision of the worlds of theatre and environmental activism. Plus, the actor who played Officer Barrel appreciated the after show treats. Very much.

I am so grateful to have been given the opportunity to witness, and lead, the production of a food commodity from start to finish. Its so easy to go to the store to buy ice cream, which is why it is mind blowing to see how many steps it takes to get it there. It all started with harvesting apples to protect bears and people. Then after cutting the apples, making the ice cream, and individually scooping the ice cream into hundreds of cups, you finally have sellable ice cream. Then you have to pull a giant freezer out of your basement, organize a team of ice cream sellers, get all the ice cream up to the theatre, come up with ice cream selling tactics, deal with confusing credit card machines, and so on and so on. Although it was a lot of work, I loved every second of it and learned so much.

With this story, I encourage everyone to think deeply about where their food came from. The production of this food could have had a positive impact on the environment, or a negative one. It is very important to make this comparison because we can make a big difference in our world just through what we choose to eat. I encourage all of you to eat wisely, and to view the world from mother nature’s perspective. And be the bear before the bear is the bear.

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