Archive for the ‘Event Management’ Category

Let Your Career Guide You

Friday, December 6th, 2013

Lynne_Andrew_2012

I want everything to be taken care of so my coaching staff does not have to worry when it is gametime

Lynne Andrew came into the room to give us some guidelines on what it is like to be in her footsteps and how she got to where she is at today, Associate Athletic Director of Fort Lewis College. She gave some pretty good insight on what it means to have strong work ethics and how to maintain a strong bond of connections with people who make an impact on your life, especially on your career. Usually one would consider that as an Associate Athletic Director your job would be to sit at a desk all day; but Lynne is always running around and her first priorities are to the student athletes. She is so passionate about her job and what she does that she would not give it up. She can discuss that when the following Tuesday rolls around the triple header day they accomplished was all worth it, cleaning the snow off the soccer fields, getting the bleachers out for spectators to sit on and even having workers available to help at the gate.

Listening to her talk about how her career has led her to where she is at today, was amazing. Lynne stated that

Everywhere I went, was a career decision.

She has this mindset that what she sets for herself she accomplishes career wise. She started off playing basketball at the Collegiate level, which led to her climbing the ladder of becoming an assistant coach at the collegiate level, and then leading to what she wanted in her life, a head coach and now as an Associate Athletic Director. She encouraged us that throughout her career she had someone to help her along the ropes and to give her guidance or refer her for the next opportunity in her career. She deserves all the credit and appreciation to help put up an event.

I took for granted going to a game, but now I know who to thank when I’m sitting on the bleachers cheering on our SkyHawks.

Love What You Do and Feel That it Matters

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

Lynne Andrew is an inspiration and an example of how hard work, building connections and following your passion can lead to a life you love.  She followed her passion for basketball through many states and not so temperate climates to pursue her dreams. My favorite quote from Lynne is:

Love what you do and feel that it matters

She followed her love of basketball to a different country being awarded a scholarship in Devil’s Lake, North Dakota.  She was even able to travel to Germany to play basketball, not knowing the language did not stop her from following her passion!  After finishing her degree in Physical Education at Montana State University, she ventured back to Devil’s Lake, North Dakota to be an assistant coach wanting to teach her skills and pass it on to others.  She kept her goal of being head coach in mind as she took a position as second assistant coach to a Division I school in Utah and moved to Idaho State to complete a Master’s in Athletic Administration before moving to Fairbanks, Alaska to gain more experience.

Her goal had changed and she wanted to continue to gain more experience in the administrative area of athletics and found that she enjoyed the experience she was gaining in compliance.  She applied for a position as Head Coach for Fort Lewis College after spending 5 years in Alaska and has been an asset to the college ever since.  She wears many hats in her position including: coordinating sporting events, budgeting, mentoring “at risk” student-athletes and making sure the college is complying with the many rules for all sports.

What I have taken away from what she shared with us is that it is important to keep your goals in mind, do not be afraid to speak up, effectively learn how to manage your time, take time to build connections with people even if you are busy and put your heart into your work because no task is too mundane even if it is pulling out bleachers for an event.

I want to apply this to my life by not losing sight of my goal to teach yoga and eventually open a studio.  After interviewing the co-owners of YogaDurango this seemed like an insurmountable feat, but I think that if I put my heart into it, continue to build connections in yoga and take opportunities to learn even the mundane aspects of business it will be achievable.

Thank you Lynne for sharing your words of wisdom.

Love to Work Hard…Associate AD Lynne Andrew

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

Fort Lewis College Assistance Athletic Director Lynne Andrew came in to ES 480, Wednesday morning to speak to us about what she does, what she has done prior, as well as her thoughts on how to be a little more successful in our future careers.

 

Upon completing high school, Lynne was offered a scholarship to play college basketball here in the US. After an illustrious playing career which included All-American accolades in college and playing professionally in Germany, Lynne returned to the United States to finish her degree and try her hand at coaching basketball.

 

 In Lynne’s first few years of coaching, she saw action as an assistant coach. After assistant coaching at a couple different colleges, Lynne saw her first opportunity to become a head coach, however, she was not chosen. Her next head coaching opportunity came by way of Fair Banks, Alaska. After the board felt they needed a change, she found herself on her way to Fort Lewis College, first as a compliance coordinator, then as the scholarship budget administrator as well. Eventually, Lynne had more positions added under her, and was then able to become the associate athletic director.

 

One of the things that Lynne said that had the biggest impact on me was when she had said connections are great but a lot of it comes down to how hard you work. I completely and full-heartedly agree with that statement. If I were to take one thing away from her talk and apply it to my career, it would be the statement she made about putting yourself out there. She said “make sure people know who you are. Give people time, and don’t put yourself on a pedestal”.  I feel that this will be very important in a fitness club or gym setting as it will allow for people to feel more comfortable with me and open the door for them to ask for advice. I will make a more conscious effort to give people time when they say hi or ask how I am doing, even if I am busy. Showing people that I have some interest in them can be help make my professional life a lot more enjoyable.

 

The advice that Lynne gave regarding hard work and success was valuable, even though we heard it all the time, it has more of an impact when you hear it in person from someone you can tell has worked hard to get where they are in life.

You get a stadium and you get stadium! Oh wait…

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Public funding for stadiums and arenas has seemed like a grand idea for cities for a long time, but is that really the case?

Since 2000, 28 new major league1 stadiums have been built costing over $9 billion dollars. More than half, over $5 billion, of the costs of the new stadiums were funded using public dollars

http://www.imakenews.com/cppa/e_article001083889.cfm?x=b11,0,w

I believe that publically funding stadiums is a good idea, it brings people of the city into the events and festivities. With this, finance generation is possible through more than one avenue, creating a multitude of ways for residents to get involved.

If a decision has been made to use tax payers money for a stadium, finance generation is possible through: (a) Government backed bonds (b) Excise duties (c) Personal seat licenses (d) State lotteries (e) Tourism taxes (f) Sales taxes (g) Ticket surcharges (h) General fund revenues, and, (i) Lodging taxes

http://www.moneyandsports.com/financing.htm

Bringing a sports team to a city and building the venues for those sport teams has been said to bring many benefits such as: increasing revenue, creating jobs, and benefiting the overall economy. When asking any residence of a city if they would like to have a major sports team reside in their city, few would say no, because of the “known” benefits and possibly personal satisfaction. What some people don’t realize it that the actual economic gain seen from publically funded stadiums is a shocking number, zero.

Milwaukee County did a report to determine the actual impact the city would see as a return on its significant investment of funding a new arena. A sports economist cited in the report stated that..

One should not anticipate that a team or a facility by itself will either  increase employment or raise per capita income in a metropolitan area

http://www.jsonline.com/news/milwaukee/publicly-funded-sports-arenas-add-little-to-local-economy-report-says-cc9ehcj-201706591.html

Again, the proponents for a new arena often say construction of a new facility will create jobs;  that those who attend sports events generate new spending; that a sports  franchise attracts tourists and companies; and that the new spending produces a  so-called multiplier effect in terms of additional spending. What is actually happening is an economic term called the “substitution effect”.

The substitution effect basically explains that instead of residents spending their money on local restaurants or movie theatres, they are spending it at the sporting arena or sporting events. So in fact, there is no gain of revenue but rather putting that revenue in a different spot. This keeps the overall entertainment spending constant, with the overall effect being that a city might actually lose money.

http://www.jsonline.com/news/milwaukee/publicly-funded-sports-arenas-add-little-to-local-economy-report-says-cc9ehcj-201706591.html

There are many studies that contradict the typical thoughts of a sports stadium benefiting the local city. With the evidence that I’ve seen, I no longer believe that a new stadium would be best for most cities. The construction and possible final cost of the project could prove detrimental if the team or funding doesn’t work out. Of course there is always the argument of personal satisfaction though. Does building a new stadium or getting a major sports team benefit society in a way that isn’t measureable?

The quality of life argument is brought to light because people of a city might be uplifted or benefited in intangible ways that make the building of a new stadium worth it. This of course would be hard to measure academically because of its qualitative values, but I believe it’s worth a shot.

Overall, building a new stadium and getting a town involved in a new project would seem like a good idea, but unfortunately is not. The fiscal benefits aren’t there and the value of the city could quite possibly go down. I do believe the quality of life measurement is the next step to go before people completely rule out the idea of a new sporting venture.

 

LPGA harnesses social media’s benefits

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

Before social media exploded into what it is now, (not that long ago) organizations of all kinds would hold expensive social events. This was the case for the LPGA. In order to bring more social attention, they utilized new social media sites. Twitter becametheir main avenue through the social media stream. Not only was holding Twitter events significantly cheaper, but it addressed a broader audience.

http://sportsbusinessnow.com/lpga-puts-an-exclamation-mark-on-the-season-with-social-media/

Twitter was not the end of it though. Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and Foursquare were great mediums of communication for the LPGA as well. These sits greatly promoted fan involvement by using social contests with prizes,

Fans were instructed to post pictures to their Instagram accounts and use the hashtag #LPGASeeWhywhere the best one will win a prize.

Thanks to social media sites, a tidal wave of public opinion and interest hit the LPGA tour and they don’t plan to stop there.

Their “social event of the season” was the icing on the cake for LPGA’s emphasis on innovative social media practices this year. If you recall, they were the first league to put player’s Twitter handle on their caddies bibs in June during the Wegmans LPGA Championship.

Now most of the golfers in the LPGA have Twitter accounts that are easily accessed.

http://www.lpga.com/golf/blogs/players-on-the-web.aspx

Their goal is to spark interest in the the majors and have them take the Twitter route as well. Perhaps they could have contests between organizations to hype fans into participation. This could improve awareness and interest to the mainstream media.

 

 

 

 

 

Minority Broadcasts?

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

Today Minorities make up most of population growth in America. In a report by  CNN, Minorities are classified as those of any race other than non-Hispanic, or single-race whites, all who currently constitute about a third of the U.S. population, according to Census figures. But by 2042, they are projected to become the majority, making up more than half the population. By 2050, 54 percent of the population will be minorities (CNN 2008).   Today sports are one of the major contributors to entertainment and have broaden their broad-casts of sports games to the minorities all over the country, especially in Los Angeles. Even though broadcasts have been started in Spanish, the second largest population in Los Angeles are the Koreans. For the NBA a huge step in broadening their sport broad casts to larger area of the Los Angeles population, the Los Angeles Lakers recently became the first NBA team to broadcast every game in Korean.

“The Los Angeles Lakers recently became the first NBA team to broadcast every game in Korean. They’re trying to appeal to the areas growing Korean population, much of which doesn’t speak English at home. But translating the broadcast into Korean has proved challenging”

http://www.npr.org/2013/01/23/170037599/l-a-lakers-broadcast-in-korean-to-draw-new-fan

Although the Lakers team seemed thrilled about the broad casts being made in Korean language, this is not the only time sports games are translated. The popularity has made it seem possible for other translated broad casts possible. More sports games being translated do happen locally, for example the Navajo Nation translates their local, and major sports game in the Navajo language live Via radio and internet www.ktnnonline.com/‎.   Sports franchises doing so, have found a good way to reach more minority groups of fans by appealing to wider audience and  sports fans.

Watch Beyonce while on the toilet? OK!

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

You really have to go but don’t want to miss a second of the action in the super bowl, what do you do? CBS made it easier than ever to make sure that you would get the ultimate Super Bowl experience no matter where you watched the game. They decided to go viral by putting a live stream of the game, commercials, and half time show onto CBSSports.com. This means that through your laptop, tablet, or mobile device you can watch the game and more.

We have developed a deeply integrated second-screen environment that perfectly complements the television broadcast of the game, from the pre-game show to the presentation of the Lombardi Trophy.

http://sportsbusinessnow.com/cbs-looks-to-bring-super-bowl-second-screen-experience-to-next-level/

Along with the CBSSports.com live stream, they’ve made the experience different by adding features that the typical television viewer would not have access to. In this package included four different camera angles so the viewer could see the game from the typical full-field 50 yard line, or switch up to be able to evaluate the game as a coach and break down formations.  Not only were additional camera angles offered but viewers could go directly to their social media with the hash tag #CBSSuperBowl, where viewers could talk amongst one another about the ads that were just seen!

The biggest part of this stream was the amount of new viewers it brought in, even if all of them weren’t in it for the game.

CBSSports.com live stream of the matchup between the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens attracted three million unique viewers to the Super Bowl XLVII video player, up 43 percent from Super Bowl XLVI.

http://www.nfl.com/superbowl/story/0ap1000000136438/article/super-bowl-xlvii-live-stream-sets-viewership-records

With that statistic came others, viewers generated nearly 10 million live video streams, up more than 100 percent from 2012, resulting in a record 114.4 million minutes streamed, which was up 46 percent over 2012’s game.

http://www.nfl.com/superbowl/story/0ap1000000136438/article/super-bowl-xlvii-live-stream-sets-viewership-records

The CBSSports.com stream not only set records but it made a new avenue of media possible that can be carried out by other networks as well. With this experiment of CBS having become a hit, networks of this years Super Bowl are already planning streams of the game and half time show. Through a Facebook profile, three or more streams are already being advertised about for the 2014 Super Bowl.

https://www.facebook.com/superbowlXLVIII2014livestream

New media avenues is the biggest hit of information streaming and advertising. If organizations can find multiple ways of getting themselves out there, I feel they will without a doubt find more success in whatever endeavor they are trying to achieve. CBS started the revolution for big sporting events and advertising, I can’t wait to see what else companies will come up with.

 

 

Sustainable Sochi? At Least It’s Not In Beijing

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

The last three Olympics have been hosted by two countries that are some of the largest perpetrators of carbon emissions and production, Canada and China, and now Russia is going to  try and host the games with a sustainable vision. It is hard to believe that these countries can keep an agreement of long term sustainability when they all have halted climate change agreements and increased drilling in places like the arctic circle. If Russia is not sustainable on a national level, can they be sustainable in Sochi?

With a population of 343,334 in 2010 it is 3,000 people smaller than Vancouver was in 2010, but Vancouver is a port city and Sochi is a resort town on the shores of the black sea. If Sochi is going to be sustainable in the short or long term they must plan accordingly for the increased tourism both during and after the games. An increase in tourism is often associated with the “backlash” of the Olympics but this does not necessarily mean the City’s population will grow at an exceeded rate. Many cities (i.e. Johannesburg) hosting International events like the World Cup and Olympics have spent economic and environmental resources building facilities that cannot be supported or used in the years afterward.  In other words they overestimate the development that their city is capable of.

If Sochi commits to limiting excess infrastructure, a sustainable games can be achievable because it is resort city that is used to and can adapt to a short term increase in population. Their short term success is also boosted by the implementation of the Sustainable Management System which outlines thoughtful impact assessment and a responsible plan-do-check-act process. Information on the SMS can be found below

http://www.sochi2014.com/en/games/strategy/sustainability/progress/

 

 

 

Can Sochi maintain the Legacy for the Olympic and Parlympic Winter Games?

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

The Sochi 2014 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games have high expectations and sustainable development plan in place to make these games a success. I believe the most difficult process of this is to maintain the Olympic Game Legacy as well as Sochi, Russia contributing their own uniqueness during their host of the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

The Games in Sochi are going to be highly innovative Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, that will express the spirit of modern Russia and bring with them sustainable, positive change for the whole country.

They want any participants, competitors and billion of TV viewers to come away with a positive impression of the Games and of Russia leaving a rich legacy for Sochi, Russia. They are planning for more than short-term their long term-goals are to be a positive contribution to their economy, cultural and environmental development of the entire Krasnodar Region. There are many examples of how the games have transformed an image of a city and can be an overall positive experience for these cities.

This rich legacy – material and non-material – remains in the host country for many years, which is why many nations compete for the right to host the Games. For the winning country, the Games are a project of national value.

The Russian Diamond is of high importance as well when talking about the values of the games. They consist of

  1. Excellence
  2. Efficiency
  3. Integration
  4. Hospitality
  5. Unity
  6. Uniqueness
  7. Respect
  8. Legacy
  9. Harmony

Sochi 2014 Organizing committee has 11 strategic objectives in place to be the most successful and they have 6 main areas of activity in the field of sustainability for the preparation of staging the Games in 2014 they are

  1. Healthy Lifestyle – develop mass and professional sport, promote healthy lifestyles, and make it possible for people with disabilities to participate in sports.
  2. Harmony with Nature – Minimal impact on climate, zero waste games and enlightenment games.
  3. Barrier-free Environment – accessibility standards and requirements that are imposed on the host-city of the Games by the IOC and the IPC.
  4. Economic Prosperity – develop job markets, develop Sochi as a mountain climate resort and sports center at an international level and help stabilize the economic development.
  5. Modern Technologies – use of innovative technology solutions, development of a legal normative base, distribution of cutting-edge experience in the area of organizing sports and mass events and the perfection of approaches and practices in the management of large projects at a federal level.
  6. Culture and National Values – maintain culture diversity, maintaining culture legacy and develop patriotism and the feeling of national pride.

With all of these procedures and emphasize on these values and preparation steps I believe Sochi, Russia can host an excellent Olympic and Paralymic Winter Games.

Sochi Needs Help – Volunteers to the Rescue!

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

volunteers_facts_3_03http://vol.sochi2014.com/en/about/facts/

Let us take a moment to understand that any olympics could not have been completed without the help of people volunteering. They volunteer their time, their money and their pride to come together to help the hosting country. People who volunteer are part of the social dimensions under the sustainability and tourism section from the book. Why people volunteer are for a variety of reasons; some just want to volunteer to be a part of the nostalgia sport tourism and be connected to the hallmark sporting event, and belong to a sense of community. In the book it states,

“In recent years, there has been a growing focus on the social benefits of event sport tourism for communities. Many believe that the social benefits are the true legacy of hosting a megaevent.” – Pedersen et. al, 2011.

Since Sochi is hosting the Olympics, Russia wants to take pride in making sure that they provide their volunteers with the top-of-the-line qualities they can benefit from. We are humans, we need to belong; and what better way to feel you belong to a community by becoming a volunteer.

With the Sochi Olympics, they want to select 25,000 from the 180,000 plus applicants who so desperately wanted to become a volunteer. How does one become a volunteer for Sochi, from the website it explains,

 For the first time in the history of the Games, volunteers will be trained not only in the host city, but across the whole country, in 17 cities at 26 volunteer centers…. The organizers of the 2014 Games face the task of giving the volunteers the necessary knowledge and skills within a very tight schedule and of inspiring the volunteers to make the Sochi Olympics the best in history.  Sochi website, 2013. http://vol.sochi2014.com/en/news/11/8987/

Sochi is in good sustainability progress by selecting people who want to volunteer, and are worthy.