Posts Tagged ‘Jimmy Kight’

NFL and the history of its TV deals

Sunday, April 27th, 2014

 

The start of professional football can be tracked all the way back to 1869 where modified London football rules were used in a game of college soccer. It wasn’t until 1939 however, that the first NFL game was televised by NBC between the Philadelphia Eagles and the Brooklyn Dodgers. By 1951 the NFL Championship Game was televised coast-to-coast for the first time, December 23. The DuMont Network paid $75,000 for the rights to the game, in which the Rams defeated the Browns 24-17. By 1955, NBC became the television home to the NFL Championship Game, paying $100,000 to the league for the rights to telecast the league finale.

As Pro Football gained in popularity, it rights fees went up causing CBS to pass on NFL Football in the mid 1990’s and allowing the new FOX Television Network to gain a foothold in the broadcast sports realm. Today, the major networks pay upwards of $550 million a year to televise NFL games which can now be seen on cable, satellite and broadcast networks. NFL announced nine-year extensions to its broadcast television packages with Fox, NBC and CBS under which the networks are expected to pay roughly 60% more. The new agreements will run through the 2022 season as the current deals expired after the 2013 season.

The NFL’s new 10-year labor agreement and increased TV rights deals are the reason that NFL teams are worth $1.04 billion on average or twice as much as the average MLB team and three times what NBA teams command. NFL games represent 23 of the 25 most-watched TV programs this fall and they attract twice as many average viewers as broadcast primetime shows. Annually, the NFL redistributes upwards of $4 billion in radio, TV and digital earnings across its 32 teams, roughly $125 million apiece, plus an equal share for the league, and that number shows no sign of declining. The 19 highest-rated fall TV programs (and 28 of the top 30) were NFL games, and this year’s Super Bowl was the most-watched program ever. 5 of the many popular sports networks: ESPN, DirecTV, FOX, NBC, and CBS all have contracts with the NFL of roughly 3.985 billion dollars a season. ESPN pays $1 billion per season (18 games), DirecTV pays $1 billion per season (8 games plus NFL Sunday Ticket), FOX pays $712.5 million per season (102 games), NBC pays $650 million per season (18 games), and CBS pays $622.5 million per season (102 games).

T.V. rights have continued to escalade for the NFL and from what history shows will only continue to keep doing so. A new contract is underway with the NFL and major networks that will keep them under contract till 2022. The fan base is so large for the NFL, do to location in major cities across the U.S. & because of this, the demand for football is high. Households who are unable to see their favorite team live, can sit back in the comfort of their own home and watch the game televised almost anywhere in the U.S. Which is why football is the highest rated fall TV program.

We continue to see an increase in fan base in the NFL which brings in more popularity to the sport. As popularity and demands for the sport increase, more games will be televised, to the point where one day each game will be broadcasted nationwide. However, when that does occur a plateau may occur and profits may stop and just maintain a steady income. If this does occur which will be some time down the road, the NFL being money hungry will expand their horizons and aim for new markets, which is one of the reasons football is trying to spread to other parts of the world; I.E. Canada, Europe. This is also why some games are hosted in London, to help promote football and to expose others about the sport, so during the future it can expand and be broadcasted as a worldwide sport.

 

http://static.nfl.com/static/content/public/image/history/pdfs/History/2013/353-372-Chronology.pdf

 

http://www.nfl.com/history/chronology/1951-1960

 

http://nfl-tv-history.blogspot.com/

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/kurtbadenhausen/2011/12/14/the-nfl-signs-tv-deals-worth-26-billion/

 

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/multimedia/photo_gallery/1103/nfl-inside-money-machine/content.2.html#ixzz308FRNGpe

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhOAzRnwpdY

 

USFL & ABL vs. NWSL

Monday, April 21st, 2014

 

The United States Football League (USFL) opened in 82’ and closed in 85’ after only 3 short seasons. Founded by David Dixon, from New Orleans, Louisiana, the USFL announced its formation on May 11, 1982, at the 21 Club in New York City. During 1982-1985, the USFL fought a bitter war with the established National Football League (the NFL) for players, fans, and media attention. In July of 1986, with a month before the league was to begin its first fall campaign, the USFL won its suit against the NFL, but was awarded $3.76. It’s time couldn’t have been better. The USFL was formed in 1982, right when the NFL was headed towards a strike. The first kickoff of the USFL in 1983 came just weeks after the Redskins were crowned Super Bowl champions after a strike-shortened nine-game season and playoff tournament. The USFL started to get into bidding wars for players. Some teams went bankrupt, in Los Angeles, the team was well known for the $40 million contract given to Steve Young. The USFL wanted to extend their success after their first successful season and tried to play games in professional stadiums but were unable to do so because of overlapping schedules with the NFL. Which along with the high salaries were reasons why it failed to exist after three seasons.

ABL or American basketball league was an independent professional basketball league for women in the United States. It only lasted from 96’ to 98’ for only 2 full seasons. On December 22nd, 1998, with almost no warning the ABL declared bankruptcy and suspended all operations. It had a higher quality of play than the WNBA did because it signed majority of its players from the 96’ national team, a possible reason it failed was due to the higher salaries offered compared to that of the WNBA. Financially they could not compete with the WNBA and had to shut down all operations.

What can the new National Women’s Soccer League (NWSL) learn from those leagues in order to stay afloat?

Since there is not a larger women’s soccer league they’re not competing like the USFL had to compete against the NFL, or the ABL trying to compete against the WNBA. If they don’t make the same mistake of spending too much money on salaries like the USFL or the ABL did, and correctly market their league, they should be able to sustain a successful sporting organization.
For a short term marketing strategy:
I would market the individual players. All ten of the highest paid women athletes are from individual sports. However, I think marketing a single player like “Hope Solo” brought a lot of attention to women’ soccer, in my opinion. Probably not the right message, since I think she is a bit of a mess, but she brought awareness to women’s sport.

Long term success:
I would continue working with NIKE and other large corporations for potential sponsors to increase awareness. Possible Women only companies like Lululemon, Athleta, might see more value and give the sport more attention than possibly NIKE, a mega-corporation. Nike is too huge of a corporation to “worry” or spend extra time on such a small market. Women specific entities are more likely to spend more or extra time and effort specific to women’s sporting events.

Bibliography:
http://www.funwhileitlasted.net/basketball/abl-galleries-1996-1998/
https://sites.google.com/site/remembertheusfl/home
http://www.nwslsoccer.com/

http://blogs.nfl.com/2013/01/17/a-brief-history-of-the-usfl/

http://www.forbes.com/fdc/welcome_mjx.shtml

 

blog 2: coaches new attitude toward academics

Monday, April 7th, 2014

 

We have all heard the term student-athlete, meaning that student comes first. However, we can see at some D1 universities that many of the players are putting the athlete in front of student. They are allowing for mediocre work in the class room to have their best athletes play on either the court or the field.

In an article discussing UNC it stated that “the football players were taking ‘easy’ classes, ones that they were guaranteed an A in.” This allows you to keep good academic standing so that you may play for the upcoming season. What happens then when these athletes form a major and are required to take harder courses? In the study, most of the football team took a major in the communications department, because it was considered an easy A major. A professor stated that he handed out grades to athletes for classes that never met, allowing them to receive an A. It even stated that for some classes there was illegal grade changes, forged faculty signatures on grade rolls, and limited or no class time at all. Athletes who turn pro are very few and by allowing these low academic standards it is not preparing them for the real world. Their whole lives they thought they would go pro and didn’t make it, now their low standards that they scooted their way through college with, may hinder them in the work force.

NCAA is soon requiring a higher academic standard for incoming athletes to play a division 1 sport. This will hopefully allow for only the top student-athletes to be accepted into that school. Possibly allowing for colleges to strive for higher academic standards for athletes throughout their amateur career. As of now the required GPA to be eligible to play is a 2.0 for college athletes.

I would first start out by requiring a minimum GPA of at least a 2.5 and offer study hall for every individual who may need it, and tutoring available each day. I would state that they are student-athletes and that student comes first. By attending this university you are agreeing to the terms and conditions of a student. You will be able to achieve a higher education while also getting to play the sport you love. However, if academic success is not met, then success on the football field or on the courts will be postponed if you are not compliable with the rules. Athletes need to be taught that their sport is second to their education. You are coming to this school to learn, and also help your team win, but in that order.

By being on scholarship you are complying that you have read and will meet these standards. I would implement a fine policy for these athletes who do not meet these requirements even after being on study hall or tutoring, and scholarships may be taken away from them if academic success is not kept.

For those who do achieve success in the classroom rewards may be handed out as an incentive to keep striving for greatness to allow these athletes to feel the need to strive for success both on and off the football field. An increase in scholarship money may be handed out to show support for the determination for success in the classroom. However, it needs to be engraved in their mind that they are here to learn first, and play a sport second. If we focus on school when it is in front of us, and focus on our sport when it is time to practice, then success will come.

Many coaches are lenient on these rules because if they do not win they may get fired, and you may not win if your best players are benched for bad grades. But we need to step up and think about the bigger picture for these kids. Most will not go pro, and if easy classes are what it takes for these students to pass college, then how well will they do in the real world where their job requires hard work and dedication in order to be successful?

We need to reevaluate the importance of school on these kids’ lives, and push them to strive for greatness, not on the field, but in the classroom.

 

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/high-school/new-ncaa-rules-require-incoming-athletes-meet-higher-academic-standards-play-division-sport-college-article-1.982115

http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/15985/