Posts Tagged ‘Scholarships’

blog 2: coaches new attitude toward academics

Monday, April 7th, 2014

 

We have all heard the term student-athlete, meaning that student comes first. However, we can see at some D1 universities that many of the players are putting the athlete in front of student. They are allowing for mediocre work in the class room to have their best athletes play on either the court or the field.

In an article discussing UNC it stated that “the football players were taking ‘easy’ classes, ones that they were guaranteed an A in.” This allows you to keep good academic standing so that you may play for the upcoming season. What happens then when these athletes form a major and are required to take harder courses? In the study, most of the football team took a major in the communications department, because it was considered an easy A major. A professor stated that he handed out grades to athletes for classes that never met, allowing them to receive an A. It even stated that for some classes there was illegal grade changes, forged faculty signatures on grade rolls, and limited or no class time at all. Athletes who turn pro are very few and by allowing these low academic standards it is not preparing them for the real world. Their whole lives they thought they would go pro and didn’t make it, now their low standards that they scooted their way through college with, may hinder them in the work force.

NCAA is soon requiring a higher academic standard for incoming athletes to play a division 1 sport. This will hopefully allow for only the top student-athletes to be accepted into that school. Possibly allowing for colleges to strive for higher academic standards for athletes throughout their amateur career. As of now the required GPA to be eligible to play is a 2.0 for college athletes.

I would first start out by requiring a minimum GPA of at least a 2.5 and offer study hall for every individual who may need it, and tutoring available each day. I would state that they are student-athletes and that student comes first. By attending this university you are agreeing to the terms and conditions of a student. You will be able to achieve a higher education while also getting to play the sport you love. However, if academic success is not met, then success on the football field or on the courts will be postponed if you are not compliable with the rules. Athletes need to be taught that their sport is second to their education. You are coming to this school to learn, and also help your team win, but in that order.

By being on scholarship you are complying that you have read and will meet these standards. I would implement a fine policy for these athletes who do not meet these requirements even after being on study hall or tutoring, and scholarships may be taken away from them if academic success is not kept.

For those who do achieve success in the classroom rewards may be handed out as an incentive to keep striving for greatness to allow these athletes to feel the need to strive for success both on and off the football field. An increase in scholarship money may be handed out to show support for the determination for success in the classroom. However, it needs to be engraved in their mind that they are here to learn first, and play a sport second. If we focus on school when it is in front of us, and focus on our sport when it is time to practice, then success will come.

Many coaches are lenient on these rules because if they do not win they may get fired, and you may not win if your best players are benched for bad grades. But we need to step up and think about the bigger picture for these kids. Most will not go pro, and if easy classes are what it takes for these students to pass college, then how well will they do in the real world where their job requires hard work and dedication in order to be successful?

We need to reevaluate the importance of school on these kids’ lives, and push them to strive for greatness, not on the field, but in the classroom.

 

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/high-school/new-ncaa-rules-require-incoming-athletes-meet-higher-academic-standards-play-division-sport-college-article-1.982115

http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/15985/

More Exercise or More $$$$?

Sunday, October 27th, 2013

The situation for Sondra paying US$125 for her two children to play in a youth baseball league is financially troublesome for her.  Once she realized this was not fitting her budget she spoke with the director of the recreation center.  He told her that because of the current budget cuts they were unable to assist her with the fees and that playing sports was a privilege, not a right.  Without the financial help from the recreation center it seems as though Sondra’s children will be unable to participate in the youth baseball league.  Does it seem ethically right to offer youth sports to people who are financially capable or should the people with issues be provided with help? Simple, it should be attacked like college by offering the financial aid approach for people with those needs.

Unfortunately, the tough place that Sondra is put in financially is an issue that pertains to many families.

From the article Youth sports costing more time and money:

It is a reality that many parents are facing when it comes to their children playing sports. Want your child to get a college scholarship? Be prepared to ante up. Even if your child does excel at the game, there are only so many scholarships to go around. Playing competitive sports isn’t cheap. And there isn’t really any end in sight.

With entering two children into the recreation program, Sondra receives a US$25 discount.  Although this helps her out slightly, she is still having issues meeting the financial demands to enter her children into the program.

Since youth sport has become an issue for the budget of some families, some youth programs have applications families can fill out to find the financial assistance in paying for these sports. For example financial aid for Youth Sports YMCA is now provided. The YMCA site says:

Thanks to the United Way of the Midlands and the YMCA’s “Strong Kids Campaign,” financial assistance is available for those in need within our available resources.

This can be found at http://youth-sports.metroymca.org/membership/financial-aid/

By providing families with the option to apply for financial aid, it allows for them to be more capable of paying for their children to participate in youth sports.  If this can be done in more areas, then more children will be able to stay active in sports that they like to engage and participate in.

10k PSA by Arthur Ray

Friday, February 22nd, 2013