Archive for March, 2010

Great Turnout for Miss Hozhoni Pageant

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

By Rhonda Sparks

        Monday, March 22nd marked the first event of public speaking for the five contestants competing for Miss Hozhoni 2010-2011.  Of the five contestants, two of which are from the far north state of Alaska.    

        Then, on Tuesday, March 23rd the food presentations portion of the pageant was held at the Native American Center. 

        The last day of the pageant was the talent section held in the Student Union Ballroom Wednesday night.  Each contestant had to present both a traditional and modern talent to

Five wonderful contestants competed for the 2010-2011 Miss Hozhoni crown.  Posing with Miss Hozhoni 2009-2010 Seratha Largie, third from left, are Stephanie Moses, Francine Hatathlie, Jennifer Bennis (the eventuall winner!), Katygene Jackson, and eventual runner-up, Caryn Hacker.

Five wonderful contestants competed for the 2010-2011 Miss Hozhoni crown. Posing with Miss Hozhoni 2009-2010 Seratha Largie, third from left, are Stephanie Moses, Francine Hatathlie, Jennifer Bennis (the eventuall winner!), Katygene Jackson, and eventual runner-up, Caryn Hacker.

judges. 

        Caryn Hacker, is a junior, double majoring in Anthropology and Art.  Her tribal affiliation is to the Rosebud Sioux, and she is originally from Rosebud, South Dakota. 

        Caryn’s interest in running for Miss Hozhoni began when she noticed the strength in the voice of Miss Hozhoni.  “Being Miss Hozhoni opens more doors to better aspects of life which need more focus and attention.  It also promotes tribal unity through combined efforts through Miss Hozhoni and diverse tribal groups.” 

        The traditional food Caryn prepared was Wasna.  She described that it as food that has been used by her people for long hunting trips and for war parties.  Wasna, is a combination of Buffalo jerky (Bapa), yellow corn meal, fat (Washi), and sugar (Cahumpi) and provides instant nourishment. 

        The modern talent Caryn presented was public speaking.  Her traditional talent was the traditional story telling of Lakota history and creations myths.  (more…)

FLC Native American and Indigenous Studies Advisory Board, 2009-2010

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010
 

 

 

 

 

The NAIS Advisory Board, 2009-2010 will meet at FLC April 12 this year.

The NAIS Advisory Board, 2009-2010 will meet at FLC April 12 this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tribal Representatives

      1.  Southern Ute Nation– Travis Blackbird, Academic Advisor, Higher Education

            (2012*)

      2.  Navajo Nation – Ferlin Clark, Dine’ College President (2011*)

      3.  Jicarilla Apache Nation –Lester Sandoval, Research and Development Specialist

            (2011*)

      4.  Ute Mountain Ute Nation – Robert Rime, Education Director (2012*)

  (more…)

Scholars’ Journal: “Intent” Becomes a Theme In FLC Native Tuition Controversies

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

Asa_support_posterBy Asa Washines

“…The concept [is] that tuition grant awards are “earned opportunities” to pursue a college education, not “free ride opportunities”.  All grantees, therefore, will be carefully and continually evaluated on the basis of whether or not they are productive students and citizens of the college community…”

Adapted by the 1971 Legislative Council

 

        This article, second in a three-part series on the Native tuition wavier at FLC, will focus  on the legal history often detrimental towards Indian students and Fort Lewis College (FLC), specifically the 1971 legislative report council report, and the most recent legislative bill HB10-1067.  The two cases circumstances were oddly similar and as citizens of the FLC community, we need to acknowledge the unique status that FLC has as an institution of higher education, especially as the college’s 100th anniversary approaches in 2011.

        The congressional agreement of 1910 that allows tuition free status for Indian students has continually faced legislatives and at times administrative obstacles from the state of Colorado.  I say administrative because the Colorado Commissions on Higher Education has restricted FLC from using tuition cost increases for the out of state students because of the waiver.  In essence, the land grant is a contract, and viewed by some individuals as a type of treaty with Indian students; land for education. 

        The foundation which the school supports Indian education lies within the college’s historic mission, which is to:

“Educate Native American students within the context of its broader contemporary mission in the Colorado public higher education system as a selective liberal arts college offering accessible, high quality, baccalaureate liberal arts education to a diverse student population, preparing citizens for the common good in an increasingly complex world.”

This statement seems to assure that that FLC will continue to offer tuition; free status for Indian students, regardless of legislative policies singling out FLC state appropriations. (more…)

Commentary: Native Women Should Also Be Honored

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010
 

 

 

Romanticized Native women are a common theme in pop culture, as this Jessica Biel rendering reveals.

Romanticized Native women are a common theme in pop culture, as this Jessica Biel rendering reveals.

By Meredith Baker

 

 

 

            

        March is Women’s History month, an event which is meant to honor the many exceptional women who have undertaken extraordinary feats. Here at Fort Lewis, Women’s History Month has been filled with discussions about and talks by women that have taken steps to advance human, environmental, and legal rights. From the monumental abortion rights case of Roe V. Wade, to the peace activist Ngawang Sangdrol, who has come to FLC in order to speak about gender and political repression in Tibet, campus has been a stir with Women’s History Month activity.

        However, one must wonder if there’s not something missing in all of the discussion and events. Native American women, whom have played an intrinsic role in American society since its inception, seem to be all but absent in the discourse of Women’s History. The mainstream conversation about great women seems to highlight certain individuals or groups while alienating others. Take for example, the events occurring at FLC during the month of March. There is a glaring lack of Native American speakers, or Native women’s issues, on the roster. What about the inadequacy of women’s health care on many reservations due to insufficient funding? What of the many Native American women that have contributed to their culture and to society? (more…)

AIBL Continues High Standards of Business Activities

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010
American Indian Business Leaders Chapter members include Patrick Littlebear, Tawnie Knight and Wil John.  The FLC chapter is one of the leading AIBL chapters in the country.

American Indian Business Leaders Chapter members include Patrick Littlebear, Tawnie Knight and Wil John. The FLC chapter is one of the leading AIBL chapters in the country.

American Indian Business Leaders (AIBL) is a local Fort Lewis College club that was developed to help promote the knowledge of business and leadership to individuals who are interested in learning about Business and Leadership. It is also a club that provides students with inspiration and opportunities to compose a business plan and present it well. The foundation of AIBL is supported through fun, volunteer opportunities, the annual conference, is what helps make AIBL what it stands for today.

        AIBL has been working hard to compose this year’s business plan, which they will be presenting at this year’s conference, which is going to be held in Carlton, Minnesota on April 8th thru the 10th. AIBL’s business plan consists of topics such as the executive summary, business description, legal form of organization, marketing strategy, financial analysis, etc. Therefore AIBL has decided to host a summer leadership camp for school youth of Durango, who are interested in the business and leadership aspects.

        Thus far AIBL has completed two fundraising events, the first is the Make a difference day, were they provided community services for older people in the local area, the services mostly included raking up leaves. The secondly they had a Halloween carnival in Ignacio Colorado. Were they had a pin the pants on the Sponge Bob booth. They have also collected a total of $4,800 in grants thus far.

        Five of the total student members are looking forward to the conference which is two weeks away. These individuals have accomplished and contributed a lot for the AIBL club through fund raising, grant writing, and creating this year’s business plan. These five members have put much time aside along with keeping up with school work.  AIBL has its weekly meeting in the Education Business Hall. They discuss future plans to better the club for the follow year’s along with planning for upcoming events. Need any more information you can contact Tawnie Knight who is the AIBL President at student email address tsknight@fortlewis.edu.